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Reading: Student perceptions and learning outcome on primary mental ability-based pharmacology learning

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Original Research Paper

Student perceptions and learning outcome on primary mental ability-based pharmacology learning

Authors:

Madhav M. Mutalik ,

MIMER Medical College, Telegaon-Dabhade, Pune, IN
About Madhav M.
Associate Professor of Pharmacology

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Maitreyee M. Mutalik

MIMER Medical College, Tategaon-Dabhade, Pune, IN
About Maitreyee M.
Assistant Professor, Department of Anatomy

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Abstract

Objectives: To test the perceptions and learning outcome of undergraduate medical students on primary mental-ability based pharmacology modules at American Institute of Medicine, Seychelles.

 

Methods: Pharmacology teaching was conducted for 13 weeks to two groups of students in the undergraduate MD program using 2 different methods. Group A (n=56) was taught by the newly designed 9 modules based on Louis Thurstone’s concept of primary mental abilities of spatial-visual and numerical abilities, perceptual speed, and inductive reasoning. Group B (n=50) received the conventional teaching with 4 traditional methods. Student perceptions were tested in both groups. Learning outcome was compared by administering a comprehensive pharmacology examination.

 

Results: Group A taught by the newly designed primary mental ability-based modules recorded higher perception scores as compared to Group B taught by traditional methods. The difference was statistically significant on two-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov Test (p < 0.025) as well as Mann-Whitney test (p < 0.025). Pharmacology examination yielded higher scores for Group A taught by primary mental ability-based modules, with a statistically significant difference on “Wilcoxon Rank Sum” (Mann-Whitney U test) (p < 0.01) and “Unpaired test” (p = 0.0097).

 

Conclusion: Student perceptions and learning outcome was strongly positive for learning modules based on primary mental abilities of spatial-visual and numerical abilities, perceptual speed, and inductive reasoning.
How to Cite: Mutalik, M.M. and Mutalik, M.M., 2013. Student perceptions and learning outcome on primary mental ability-based pharmacology learning. South-East Asian Journal of Medical Education, 7(1), pp.38–44. DOI: http://doi.org/10.4038/seajme.v7i1.148
Published on 30 Jun 2013.
Peer Reviewed

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